University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

  • Umberto Ansaldo is a humanist specializing in the study of language, society and human history. He has written extensively on the origins and dynamics of contact languages in Monsoon Asia. He has also conducted field-work on endangered and shifting languages of South and Southeast Asia, such as Sri Lanka Malay, Cocos Malay and Makista. He is currently working on a book on linguistic revival and nationalism.
  • https://hku-hk.academia.edu/UmbertoAnsaldo

University of Mainz, Germany

  • Walter Bisang has been professor of General and Comparative Linguistics at the University of Mainz (Germany) since 1992. Before that, he obtained his PhD on verb serialization in Chinese, Hmong, Vietnamese, Thai and Khmer at the University of Zürich (1990, Switzerland). His more recent typological research is focused on linguistic complexity (overt vs. hidden complexity), grammaticalization and linguistic contact (structural convergence, linguistic areas). One of his main concerns is to contribute to the theory of language from the perspective of East and mainland Southeast Asian languages. He has widely published on linguistic phenomena like numeral classifiers, serial verbs, parts of speech, finiteness and argument structure. Walter Bisang has taught courses in China, Mexico, Nigeria, Thailand and various countries of Europe. He has directed a collaborative research center of ‘Linguistic and Cultural Contact’ (1999 – 2008, funded by the German Research Foundation) and he is a member of the Academia Europaea since 2016.
  • http://www.linguistik.fb05.uni-mainz.de/mitarbeiter/walter-bisang/

La Trobe University

  • David Bradley is a scholar of very wide interests and achievements. He is a leading international specialist in Tibeto-Burman and other East and Southeast Asian languages, and has also contributed to the understanding of Australian English and its local and international context. His research publications include extensive studies in sociohistorical linguistics, including geolinguistics, lexicography, historical linguistics, and various areas of sociolinguistics such as variation, language contact, languag epolicy and language maintenance, especially for the maintenance of endangered languages.
  • http://www.latrobe.edu.au/assc/contact/staff/profile?uname=dbradley
  • http://latrobe.academia.edu/DavidBradley

University of Ottawa, Canada

  • Marc Brunelle is Associate Professor in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Ottawa. His research interests include phonology and phonetics, tone and phonation, prosody, language contact, and field phonetics, with a special focus on Mainland Southeast Asia.  Most of his published research deals these issues in Vietnamese and Cham.  He has been teaching phonetics and phonology at the undergraduate and graduate levels for more than 10 years and has given seminars on his areas of expertise in Vietnam, Thailand, France and the United States.
  • http://arts.uottawa.ca/linguistics/people/brunelle-marc
  • http://aix1.uottawa.ca/~mbrunell/

University of Sydney, Australia

  • N. J. Enfield is Professor of Linguistics at the University of Sydney. His wide-ranging research on language, culture, and cognition is based on extensive field work in mainland Southeast Asia, especially Laos. His books include “A Grammar of Lao” (Mouton 2007), “Natural Causes of Language” (LangSci Press 2014), “The Utility of Meaning” (Oxford 2015), and “Languages of Mainland Southeast Asia” (Mouton 2015, edited with Bernard Comrie)
  • https://sydney.edu.au/arts/staff/profiles/nick.enfield.php

University of Edinburgh

  • James Kirby is a Lecturer in Phonetics at the School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences, University of Edinburgh. He completed his dissertation on computational modeling of sound change at the University of Chicago in 2010. His other research interests center on the phonetics and phonology of tone and register systems, especially in Southeast Asian languages. He has previously taught summer courses at Vietnam National University in Hanoi, the European Summer School on Logic, Language, and Information (ESSLLI), and the 2013 Linguistic Institute.
  • http://www.lel.ed.ac.uk/~jkirby/

University of California, Berkeley

  • James A. Matisoff is Emeritus Professor of Linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of eight books and dozens of articles on Southeast Asian linguistics, especially the languages of the Tibeto-Burman family, and in particular, on Lahu. He was the Principal Investigator of the Sino-Tibetan Etymological Dictionary and Thesaurus project (STEDT) from 1986 to 2015. He has directed 29 doctoral dissertations.
  • http://stedt.berkeley.edu/JAM

Mahidol University, Thailand

Weera Ostapirat was born in Bangkok and received his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley. He has taught at Mahidol University, Thailand, with a research focus on Tai and Southeast Asian linguistics. His main interests are in the genetic relationships of the languages of East/Southeast Asian areas and the linguistic implications for the (pre)history and cultures of their peoples. Notable publications include Proto-Kra (Berkeley: Linguistics of the Tibeto-Burman Area), “Kra-Dai and Austronesian: Notes on the phonological correspondences and vocabulary distribution” (in The peopling of East Asia: Putting together archaeology, linguistics, and genetics), and “Sino-Tai Hypothesis” (in Encyclopedia of Chinese Language and Linguistics).

Dartmouth College, USA

Chulalongkorn University, Thailand

  • Pittayawat Pittayaporn (Joe) is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Linguistics, Faculty of Arts, Chulalongkorn University. His research interests include metrical and prosodic phonology, tonal changes, phonological reconstruction, and language contact. In addition to his  specialization in Kra-Dai languages, he has also worked on Austronesian, Austroasiatic, and Tibeto-Burman languages. He has carried out fieldwork in various locations in Thailand, Vietnam, and China.
  • http://pioneer.netserv.chula.ac.th/~ppittaya/

Dartmouth College, USA

  • James N. Stanford is Associate Professor of Linguistics at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. After completing a B.Sc. in Physics (1990), he spent about seven years in China before returning to the U.S. for graduate school (PhD Linguistics, Michigan State, 2007). His research focuses on quantitative analyses of language variation and change in Sui and other less commonly studied communities of East/Southeast Asia and elsewhere (e.g., Variation in Indigenous Minority Languages, 2009, co-edited with Dennis Preston). He also conducts fieldwork on English dialects of New England. His research includes acoustic sociophonetics, sociotonetics, tone languages, dialect contact/acquisition, gender, exogamy, social identity, dialect geography, urban and rural dialectology, and computational methods.
  • http://linguistics.dartmouth.edu/people/james-n-stanford
  • http://www.dartmouth.edu/~jstanford/

Cornell University, USA

  • John Whitman is a professor in and chair of the Department of Linguistics at Cornell University. He was previously chair of the Department of Crosslinguistic Studies at the National Institute of Japanese Language and Linguistics in Tokyo, Japan. His linguistic specializations are East Asian linguistics, comparative syntax, language typology, and historical linguistics He is currently editor of the journal Korean Linguistics (John Benjamins). Recent publications in linguistics include the chapter on “Topic Prominence” in the Blackwell Companion to Syntax (to appear, 2017; co-authored with Waltraud Paul), a co-edited volume Ryūkyū shogo to Kodai Nihongo: Nichiryū sogo no saiken ni mukete (Ryūkyūan and Premodern Japanese: Toward the Reconstruction of Proto-Japanese-Ryūkyūan, 2016) and the chapter “Old Korean” in the Blackwell Handbook of Korean Linguistics (2015).